the room
- Period furniture, drapery and a multitude of items found in flea markets, antique stores and rental houses were shipped from England to New York to decorate the inside of the Baker Street residence. “We brought all of the props here from England because British Victorian is very different from American Victorian,” set decorator Katie Spencer says. “It has a certain style and is very hard to get.”In its clutter and chaos the apartment reveals both Conan Doyle’s depiction of Holmes’s disorganized personal habits and the detective’s brilliant, complex mind. “Everything is supposed to represent his journeys, his travels, his inquisitive nature into the human condition and the human anatomy, chemistry, and photography…frankly, anything that’s worthy of Holmes’s interest,” explains Ritchie.Dog-eared books, newspapers, paintings from the Near East, unpaid bills, maps of Britain, anatomical drawings, Oriental carpets and a tiger skin rug, and half-eaten food from forgotten meals, not to mention Watson’s rather tolerant dog, Gladstone, can all be found in Holmes’s living quarters. In keeping with his profession, there are also wigs, mustaches and false noses for disguises, and a padded post for Holmes’s martial arts practice.”

the room

- Period furniture, drapery and a multitude of items found in flea markets, antique stores and rental houses were shipped from England to New York to decorate the inside of the Baker Street residence. “We brought all of the props here from England because British Victorian is very different from American Victorian,” set decorator Katie Spencer says. “It has a certain style and is very hard to get.”

In its clutter and chaos the apartment reveals both Conan Doyle’s depiction of Holmes’s disorganized personal habits and the detective’s brilliant, complex mind. “Everything is supposed to represent his journeys, his travels, his inquisitive nature into the human condition and the human anatomy, chemistry, and photography…frankly, anything that’s worthy of Holmes’s interest,” explains Ritchie.

Dog-eared books, newspapers, paintings from the Near East, unpaid bills, maps of Britain, anatomical drawings, Oriental carpets and a tiger skin rug, and half-eaten food from forgotten meals, not to mention Watson’s rather tolerant dog, Gladstone, can all be found in Holmes’s living quarters. In keeping with his profession, there are also wigs, mustaches and false noses for disguises, and a padded post for Holmes’s martial arts practice.”